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Norwegian family looking for lost earrings, finds ancients Viking-era artifacts instead

Norwegian family looking for lost earrings, finds ancients Viking-era artifacts instead
  • PublishedSeptember 29, 2023

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One expert concluded that the buckle dates from between 780 and 850.—Cultural Heritage of Vestfold and Telemark
One expert concluded that the buckle dates from between 780 and 850.—Cultural Heritage of Vestfold and Telemark  

The Aasviks were looking for their lost earrings in their Norwegian garden when they made an unexpected discovery of ancient artefacts dating back over 1,000 years.

Among their findings was a bowl-shaped buckle, along with another object that appears to be associated with a Viking-era burial.

These artefacts are believed to have played a role in the ninth-century burial of a woman on the small island of Jomfruland, located off Norway’s southern coast. The discovery was made beneath a large tree at the heart of the family’s garden.

The discovery was made on the small island of Jomfruland.—Cultural Heritage of Vestfold and Telemark
The discovery was made on the small island of Jomfruland.—Cultural Heritage of Vestfold and Telemark

The significance of this finding is not to be underestimated. While experts knew of settlements on the island with a history spanning centuries, concrete evidence had previously only extended as far back as the Middle Ages. The buckle, which has been dated to between 780 and 850, sheds light on a much earlier period.

Authorities and experts commended the Aasvik family for promptly reporting this remarkable discovery. In recognition of their find, the Cultural Heritage of Vestfold and Telemark County Council celebrated the family’s contribution to uncovering the island’s Viking-era history in a Facebook post.

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